Stripping Kitchen Cabinets

Next Up How to Give Your Kitchen Cabinets a Makeover Refinishing your worn kitchen cabinets can be a cost-saving alternative to replacing them. Staining Kitchen Cabinets Check out these easy tips for transforming your kitchen cabinets into beautiful showpieces through the process of staining. Unfinished Kitchen Cabinets Browse helpful info on unfinished kitchen cabinets, and sort through options for staining, painting or leaving them in their natural state. Distressed Kitchen Cabinets This timeless antique look for your kitchen cabinets is all the character your kitchen needs. Distressed Kitchen Cabinets Get all the info you need on distressed kitchen cabinets, and create a welcoming and casually chic design in your kitchen. Kitchen Cabinet Colors and Finishes Find helpful tips for choosing colors and finishes for your kitchen cabinets that reflect your personality and style. How to Paint Kitchen Cabinets Get a budget-friendly way to update your kitchen cabinets with paint and a simple glaze treatment. Distressed and Antiqued Kitchen Cabinets Add cottage-style charm to white painted cabinets by distressing then applying antiquing glaze. This quick and easy project will give builder basic cabinets a custom look in no time. Kitchen Cabinet Components Get the information you need on the different components and accessories available for custom kitchen cabinets. Kitchen Cabinet Colors and Finishes Explore your options for kitchen cabinet colors and finishes, and get ready to create a kitchen with supreme style.
stripping kitchen cabinets 1

Stripping Kitchen Cabinets

How to Give Your Kitchen Cabinets a Makeover Refinishing your worn kitchen cabinets can be a cost-saving alternative to replacing them. Staining Kitchen Cabinets Check out these easy tips for transforming your kitchen cabinets into beautiful showpieces through the process of staining. Unfinished Kitchen Cabinets Browse helpful info on unfinished kitchen cabinets, and sort through options for staining, painting or leaving them in their natural state. Distressed Kitchen Cabinets This timeless antique look for your kitchen cabinets is all the character your kitchen needs. Distressed Kitchen Cabinets Get all the info you need on distressed kitchen cabinets, and create a welcoming and casually chic design in your kitchen. Kitchen Cabinet Colors and Finishes Find helpful tips for choosing colors and finishes for your kitchen cabinets that reflect your personality and style. How to Paint Kitchen Cabinets Get a budget-friendly way to update your kitchen cabinets with paint and a simple glaze treatment. Distressed and Antiqued Kitchen Cabinets Add cottage-style charm to white painted cabinets by distressing then applying antiquing glaze. This quick and easy project will give builder basic cabinets a custom look in no time. Kitchen Cabinet Components Get the information you need on the different components and accessories available for custom kitchen cabinets. Kitchen Cabinet Colors and Finishes Explore your options for kitchen cabinet colors and finishes, and get ready to create a kitchen with supreme style.
stripping kitchen cabinets 2

Stripping Kitchen Cabinets

Stripping and Refinishing Cabinets If your cabinets still don’t look spectacular after cleaning, you may have to refinish or paint them. The cabinet-refinishing process is similar to the one for refinishing furniture. Unless you’re planning to take your cabinets down, there are a few extra things to remember. As you’ve already discovered from cleaning, working with cabinets in place on the wall can be messy and awkward. Liquid strippers work best, but use the gel or semipaste types. They won’t drip as much when used on vertical surfaces. However, before you can buy the proper stripper, you’ll need to find out what kind of finish is on your cabinets. The original finish is one of several possible materials. Most of them look identical to an untrained eye. Use the chart below to determine what type of finish you have. Find an inconspicuous spot on the wood to perform the tests. If You Suspect Your Finish Is Determine By Wax Put a few drops of turpentine on the wood. If the finish dissolves, it’s wax-based. Shellac Apply a few drops of denatured alcohol. If the finish dissolves quickly, it’s shellac. Lacquer or Shellac Try a few drops of lacquer thinner to dissolve. Water-Based Finish A few drops of Xylene liquefies water-based finishes. Polyurethane or Varnish Paint / varnish remover strips these materials, but you’ll probably still have to sand some of the old finish off. Other Finishes You May Encounter (and What to Do About Them) Penetrating Oil The product does just what its name says, so nothing can remove it. The color isn’t strippable since it’s become part of the wood. If the wood is dry, it can be clear-coated, waxed or painted. Paint Determine whether the paint is oil-based or water-based (latex). Rub a rag or cotton ball moistened with denatured alcohol on the paint surface. If it rubs off or gets soft, it’s latex. Alcohol won’t affect oil paint. Latex paint can be applied over oil if the old surface has been lightly sanded and properly primed. Vinyl-Covered or Formica Surfaces Don’t attempt to paint or refinish. A professional should refinish cabinets surfaced with these materials. Always let the stripping agent do the work. These products are relatively easy to use. But if you’re not an experienced refinisher, you may want to start with an inconspicuous area or door. Remember to keep countertops, appliances and floors covered when stripping and refinishing. After stripping and before refinishing or painting, patch any conspicuous holes, scratches and nicks with wood filler. When dry, sand lightly to smooth out the patch. Before painting, sand lightly and prime. Note: Before you decide to paint floating-panel cabinet doors, remember that the wood expands and contracts with the seasons. This will cause the paint bead to separate and expose unpainted wood. Good to KnowBefore undertaking refinishing, remind yourself that it takes a lot of time and effort. Also, remember that your kitchen may be out of commission for a while. CautionWhen using any chemical, always follow the manufacturer’s instructions for use and safety.
stripping kitchen cabinets 3

Stripping Kitchen Cabinets

If your cabinets still don’t look spectacular after cleaning, you may have to refinish or paint them. The cabinet-refinishing process is similar to the one for refinishing furniture. Unless you’re planning to take your cabinets down, there are a few extra things to remember. As you’ve already discovered from cleaning, working with cabinets in place on the wall can be messy and awkward. Liquid strippers work best, but use the gel or semipaste types. They won’t drip as much when used on vertical surfaces. However, before you can buy the proper stripper, you’ll need to find out what kind of finish is on your cabinets. The original finish is one of several possible materials. Most of them look identical to an untrained eye. Use the chart below to determine what type of finish you have. Find an inconspicuous spot on the wood to perform the tests. If You Suspect Your Finish Is Determine By Wax Put a few drops of turpentine on the wood. If the finish dissolves, it’s wax-based. Shellac Apply a few drops of denatured alcohol. If the finish dissolves quickly, it’s shellac. Lacquer or Shellac Try a few drops of lacquer thinner to dissolve. Water-Based Finish A few drops of Xylene liquefies water-based finishes. Polyurethane or Varnish Paint / varnish remover strips these materials, but you’ll probably still have to sand some of the old finish off. Other Finishes You May Encounter (and What to Do About Them) Penetrating Oil The product does just what its name says, so nothing can remove it. The color isn’t strippable since it’s become part of the wood. If the wood is dry, it can be clear-coated, waxed or painted. Paint Determine whether the paint is oil-based or water-based (latex). Rub a rag or cotton ball moistened with denatured alcohol on the paint surface. If it rubs off or gets soft, it’s latex. Alcohol won’t affect oil paint. Latex paint can be applied over oil if the old surface has been lightly sanded and properly primed. Vinyl-Covered or Formica Surfaces Don’t attempt to paint or refinish. A professional should refinish cabinets surfaced with these materials. Always let the stripping agent do the work. These products are relatively easy to use. But if you’re not an experienced refinisher, you may want to start with an inconspicuous area or door. Remember to keep countertops, appliances and floors covered when stripping and refinishing. After stripping and before refinishing or painting, patch any conspicuous holes, scratches and nicks with wood filler. When dry, sand lightly to smooth out the patch. Before painting, sand lightly and prime. Note: Before you decide to paint floating-panel cabinet doors, remember that the wood expands and contracts with the seasons. This will cause the paint bead to separate and expose unpainted wood.
stripping kitchen cabinets 4

Stripping Kitchen Cabinets

In this video, This Old House host Kevin O’Connor helps a homeowner refinish his kitchen cabinets. Steps: 1. Make a sketch of the kitchen cabinets, then identify each door and drawer with a number. 2. Place a small strip of masking tape onto each door and drawer, then mark the strips with the corresponding number shown on the sketch. 3. Use a cordless drill to unscrew all the doors from the cabinets. 4. Unscrew and remove the door hinges. 5. Remove all the drawers from the cabinets. 6. Use a putty knife to scrape any rubber bumpers from the back side of the doors. 7. Unpeel the tape from one of the doors and then scrub its surface with a scouring pad dampened with deglosser. (If any doors or face frames have a coating of greasy, oily residue, wash them clean with hot, soapy water prior to deglossing.) 8. Wipe down the door with a cotton rag soaked in clean water. 9. Dry the door with a clean, dry cotton rag, then flip the door over. 10. Repeat the previous two steps to degloss the back surface of the door. 11. Cover appliances and counters with plastic-lined canvas drop cloths. 12. Use the scouring pad and deglosser to scrub the surfaces of the face frames on the upper and lower cabinets. 13. Wash the face frames clean with a water-soaked rag, then wipe the frames dry. 14. Wait one hour before proceeding. 15. Remove all the drawer faces, then degloss and wash each one. 16. Protect the wall around the cabinets and all other adjacent surfaces with masking tape. 17. Use a 2-inch-wide synthetic-bristle paintbrush to apply the first bond coat to all the cabinet doors, drawers, and face frames. 18. Allow the first bond coat to dry for 2 hours. 19. Flip over the doors and apply a bond coat to their back surfaces. Wait another two hours. 20. Repeat the previous three steps to apply a second bond coat to both sides of each door and to the drawer faces and face frames. 21. Brush on the protective top coat of polyurethane to all surfaces of the doors, drawers, and face frames. Allow the top coat to dry for 12 hours. 22. Screw the hinges back onto the doors, then mount the doors to the cabinets. 23. Install the door pulls. 24. Reattach the drawer faces and slide the drawers back into the cabinets.

Stripping Kitchen Cabinets

Stripping Kitchen Cabinets
Stripping Kitchen Cabinets