Adding Crown Molding To Kitchen Cabinets

Julie Williams Design 1. Traditional crown molding. Traditional crown molding tends to be the industry standard for kitchen cabinetry. Here it has been used to fill an empty space between the cabinets and the ceiling. Empty space above cabinets is a common problem, because the distance fluctuates depending on ceiling height and cabinetry height. If you have an average ceiling height, about 8 feet high, 3 to 6 inches of crown molding can usually help fill any kitchen cabinet gaps. Anthony Baratta LLC 2. Stacked crown molding. Many ceilings are too high for the designer to take the cabinetry all the way up, so crown molding becomes more of a decorative element, like in this kitchen. This crown molding is composed of many pieces of molding, all meticulously stacked on top of one another for a uniform look. Moldings are detailed design accents, so some types can be expensive. They’re usually priced by the linear foot and, since most are available in 8-foot lengths, it’s easy for the cost to add up. One rule of thumb: The more elaborate the design, the more expensive it usually is. Blue Sky Building Company 3. Stepped crown molding. This kitchen design uses upper cabinets in varying heights for a stepped look, and the molding has the same stepped appearance.To pull off this look, you may want professional help. The placement of each piece of molding needs to be precisely calculated, and the end of the molding needs to butt up against an adjacent wall or cabinet. It may sound easy, but it definitely isn’t! 4. Interior crown molding. Placed around the perimeter of this kitchen’s ceiling, the crown molding immediately draws the eye upward. And it incorporates the ceiling’s crown molding for continuity. It is important to know that additional molding means an additional expense. Looking to save money? Try interior moldings made out of foam or a similar material. Marlene Wangenheim AKBD, CAPS, Allied Member ASID 5. Edge molding. Moldings can be added to almost every part of a cabinet or shelf. This homeowner or designer added molding to the outside edge of the shelving, known as an edge molding. Decorative molding on open shelving not only adds a new design feature, but it can also add a structural element. Some shelving, depending on the span (anything over 36 inches) can bow from weight if it isn’t supported correctly. Applying an edge molding to the outside edge of the shelf can prevent sagging. Style de Vie Design 6. Light molding. Also known as a light rail, molding on the bottom of cabinets helps conceal undercabinet lighting. Light molding offers huge impact for your dollar. It’s often available as a standard cabinetry feature in multiple styles and lengths, meaning it has almost no impact on a budget. East Hill Cabinetry 7. Shoe molding. Shoe molding (sometimes known as quarter round) is applied to the perimeter of all the base cabinets here, connecting cabinetry to flooring. You can install shoe molding to match your cabinets, as shown here, or to match your flooring.Should you have to install new flooring in your kitchen without removing the base cabinetry, shoe molding can help hide any installation imperfections by camouflaging cut edges. OTM Designs & Remodeling Inc. 8. Applied molding. Molding on walls or built-in cabinetry is called applied molding, because the molding is adhered or applied to the surface. The most common area in the kitchen for applied molding is the surround for the range hood. This area is often a focal point, so it demands attention to detail. Molding is usually added to coordinate or match with the door style or surrounding motifs. Although it seems like a small detail, applied molding creates balance and cohesion. Artisan Custom Interiors 9. Bottom molding. Molding at the bottom of the base cabinet doors and above the toe kick is known as a bottom molding. As you can see here, it helps make an island look more like furniture than kitchen cabinetry, especially when it’s used in conjunction with some of the other molding elements mentioned previously.
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Adding Crown Molding To Kitchen Cabinets

Adding molding to your upper kitchen cabinets will allow you to quickly and inexpensively update their appearance. Adding molding can also increase the resale value of your home, making it an ideal project for homeowners looking to sell. Installing molding along the top of your cabinets is performed in the same manner as installing crown molding along your ceilings, with a few small changes. You can add molding to cabinets either before or after the cabinets are installed. The entire process requires only a few tools.
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Adding Crown Molding To Kitchen Cabinets

Attach Crown Molding Dry fit the crown molding by holding the front piece and a side piece against the front and side of the baseboard (Image 1). Make sure the pieces are together and in place snugly. Use a pin nailer to nail into the corners of the two pieces of crown molding (Image 2). Using a nail gun, nail the crown to the baseboard. Dry fit the final side piece of crown molding, and nail it into place.
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Adding Crown Molding To Kitchen Cabinets

Step Two // How to Install Kitchen Cabinet Crown Molding with a Hardwood Frame Cut and Attach the Crown. Photo by Wendell T. Webber Take the frame back to the workbench and shim it up by ⅛ inch to create a slight overhang for the crown. Miter and trim the crown to match the cabinets’ run—the crown’s ends will extend past the frame’s ends by ⅛ inch. Rest the crown’s bottom edge on the bench, glue the joints, and fasten the frame to the crown’s back side, as shown, using 1¼-inch screws.
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Adding Crown Molding To Kitchen Cabinets

OTM Designs & Remodeling Inc. 8. Applied molding. Molding on walls or built-in cabinetry is called applied molding, because the molding is adhered or applied to the surface. The most common area in the kitchen for applied molding is the surround for the range hood. This area is often a focal point, so it demands attention to detail. Molding is usually added to coordinate or match with the door style or surrounding motifs. Although it seems like a small detail, applied molding creates balance and cohesion.
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Adding Crown Molding To Kitchen Cabinets

8. Applied molding. Molding on walls or built-in cabinetry is called applied molding, because the molding is adhered or applied to the surface. The most common area in the kitchen for applied molding is the surround for the range hood. This area is often a focal point, so it demands attention to detail. Molding is usually added to coordinate or match with the door style or surrounding motifs. Although it seems like a small detail, applied molding creates balance and cohesion.
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Adding Crown Molding To Kitchen Cabinets

Anthony Baratta LLC 2. Stacked crown molding. Many ceilings are too high for the designer to take the cabinetry all the way up, so crown molding becomes more of a decorative element, like in this kitchen. This crown molding is composed of many pieces of molding, all meticulously stacked on top of one another for a uniform look. Moldings are detailed design accents, so some types can be expensive. They’re usually priced by the linear foot and, since most are available in 8-foot lengths, it’s easy for the cost to add up. One rule of thumb: The more elaborate the design, the more expensive it usually is.
adding crown molding to kitchen cabinets 7

Adding Crown Molding To Kitchen Cabinets

2. Stacked crown molding. Many ceilings are too high for the designer to take the cabinetry all the way up, so crown molding becomes more of a decorative element, like in this kitchen. This crown molding is composed of many pieces of molding, all meticulously stacked on top of one another for a uniform look. Moldings are detailed design accents, so some types can be expensive. They’re usually priced by the linear foot and, since most are available in 8-foot lengths, it’s easy for the cost to add up. One rule of thumb: The more elaborate the design, the more expensive it usually is.
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Julie Williams Design 1. Traditional crown molding. Traditional crown molding tends to be the industry standard for kitchen cabinetry. Here it has been used to fill an empty space between the cabinets and the ceiling. Empty space above cabinets is a common problem, because the distance fluctuates depending on ceiling height and cabinetry height. If you have an average ceiling height, about 8 feet high, 3 to 6 inches of crown molding can usually help fill any kitchen cabinet gaps.
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1. Traditional crown molding. Traditional crown molding tends to be the industry standard for kitchen cabinetry. Here it has been used to fill an empty space between the cabinets and the ceiling. Empty space above cabinets is a common problem, because the distance fluctuates depending on ceiling height and cabinetry height. If you have an average ceiling height, about 8 feet high, 3 to 6 inches of crown molding can usually help fill any kitchen cabinet gaps.
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Instructions You’ll do a considerable amount of nailing for this project, so consider buying an 18-gauge finish nailer and air compressor to work faster and more precisely with less damage to the moulding. Nailer and air compressor kits provide the nailing tools you’ll need, often for less than buying the tools separately. Step 1 Provide a nailing surface for crown moulding by attaching solid wood mounting strips to the top edges of the cabinets. Cut strips of straight 3/4-in x 1-1/2-in wood to fit the front and sides of each cabinet. (Use one long strip for a row of cabinets the same depth.) Then apply wood glue to each strip, nail it in place, and let dry. Step 2 Cut one side piece at least 3-in oversize. Hold it in position on the side of the cabinet with one end flush with the back and mark the location of your miter cut. You could measure, mark, and then cut pieces to size, but that method increases the possibility of errors that leave gaps on mitered corners. By using the mounting strips and cabinets to measure part lengths, you’ll create corners that require a minimum of filler. Step 3 Miter-cut the crown moulding to length. Then nail it in position against the mounting board with the bottom edge even with the top of the cabinet side. To set up your miter saw for consistent miters, first cut a 3/4-in x 1-1/2-in board the length of your saw base. Apply double-face tape only to the faces of the board that will rest on the saw base — not on the part that rotates. Remove the backing on the tape and rest a length of crown moulding against the saw fence with the flat edges against the fence and saw base. Place the 3/4-in x 1-1/2-in board against the crown moulding to hold it in place, press down on the taped areas, and remove the crown moulding. Rotate the saw to a 45-degree miter setting and cut through the 3/4-in x 1-1/2-in board. Rotate it to the other 45-degree setting, make a second cut, and remove the center section. Now you have a support for your crown moulding that also tells you the precise location of your saw blade. Step 4 On a front moulding cut about 6-in oversize, and then miter-cut one end to match the miter of the side moulding. Hold the mitered ends together while a helper marks the other end at the cabinet side. Step 5 Miter-cut the front piece to length and nail in place against the mounting board with the bottom edge even with the top of the cabinet frame. Aligning the bottom moulding edge with the top of the cabinet frame should eliminate curves and sags. As a precaution, though, check your work immediately to make sure the moulding runs in a straight line. Step 6 To apply the final side moulding, miter-cut one end of the moulding about 1/4-in longer than the moulding on the opposite edge. Test fit and gradually shorten the piece using miter cuts until you have a snug fit. Then nail the final side moulding in place. Good to Know Sometimes, a row of cabinets will exceed the 8-ft length of a moulding strip. If you need to splice two or more pieces, cut mitered ends that fit together. Cut the combined pieces to length. Then glue and nail through both pieces at the splice to hold them together. Step 7 Use drywall hole patch to fill nail holes and any gaps at the corners. (The patch material we used goes on pink and turns white when it dries.) Use a 320-grit sanding sponge to smooth the patched areas. Apply two coats of paint to match the cabinet finish. If you’re working with a stained wood cabinet finish and using unpainted wood mouldings, remove one of the doors and take it to the store. Ask a Lowe’s associate for advice on matching the color and sheen of the door finish.